Thurs 5 – 8pm. Weekends 12 – 5pm.

POSTER.2

‘The Romance of Dereliction’

OVADA Emerging Curators Scheme 2013

Oxfordshire Art Weeks

Curated by Hannah Clark, Emma McKinlay, Rosie Turner

4 – 19 May

Featuring: Aliki Braine, Zsuzsanna Nyul, Emma Papworth, Robert Rapoport and Mary Robinson

Exhibition Runs 04 – 19 May.

FLYER

‘The Romance of Dereliction’

OVADA Emerging Curators Scheme 2013

Oxfordshire Art Weeks

Curated by Hannah Clark, Emma McKinlay, Rosie Turner

4 – 19 May

Featuring: Aliki Braine, Zsuzsanna Nyul, Emma Papworth, Robert Rapoport and Mary Robinson

Dereliction: A Source of Creativity

‘The Romance of Dereliction’

OVADA Emerging Curators Scheme 2013

4 – 19 May

Featuring: Aliki Braine, Zsuzsanna Nyul, Emma Papworth, Robert Rapoport and Mary Robinson

Curated by Hannah Clark, Emma McKinlay, Rosie Turner

Photos by Hannah Clark.

Emerging Curators 2013
https://ovadaemergingcuratorsscheme2013.wordpress.com/

Private View. 04.05.13

‘The Romance of Dereliction’

OVADA Emerging Curators Scheme 2013

Featuring: Aliki Braine, Zsuzsanna Nyul, Emma Papworth, Robert Rapoport and Mary Robinson

Curated by Hannah Clark, Emma McKinlay, Rosie Turner

Photos by Hannah Clark

The Process of Installation

‘The Romance of Dereliction’

OVADA Emerging Curators Scheme 2013

Featuring: Aliki Braine, Zsuzsanna Nyul, Emma Papworth, Robert Rapoport and Mary Robinson

Curated by Hannah Clark, Emma McKinlay, Rosie Turner

Photos by Hannah Clark

Creative Destruction

Dereliction offers us the promise of creativity and regeneration.

 

‘The Romance of Dereliction’

OVADA Emerging Curators Scheme 2013

Featuring: Aliki Braine, Zsuzsanna Nyul, Emma Papworth, Robert Rapoport and Mary Robinson

Curated by Hannah Clark, Emma McKinlay, Rosie Turner

Photos by Hannah Clark

Fabric of Decay

Vein-like cracks, scabbing paint, raw brickwork – the lifeblood of the space.

‘The Romance of Dereliction’

OVADA Emerging Curators Scheme 2013

Featuring: Aliki Braine, Zsuzsanna Nyul, Emma Papworth, Robert Rapoport and Mary Robinson

Curated by Hannah Clark, Emma McKinlay, Rosie Turner

Photos by Hannah Clark

Inspired: Gaston Bachelard, The Poetics of Space

“The poetic image […] is not an echo of the past. On the contrary: through the brilliance of any image, the distant past resounds with echoes.”

“The old house is a geometry of echoes. The voices of the past do not sound the same in the big room as in th small bedchamber and calls on the stairs have yet another sound. Among the most difficult memories, well beyond geometry that can be drawn, we must recapture the quality of light and the sweet smells that linger in empty rooms, setting an aerial seal on each room in the house of memory.”

“Air is the very substance of our freedom, the substance of superhuman joy…. aerial joy is freedom.”

“For a knowledge of intimacy, localization in the spaces of our intimacy is more urgent than determination of dates.”

“Of course, thanks to the house, a great many of our memories are housed, and if the house is a bit elaborate, if it has a cellar and a garret, nooks and corridors, our memories have refuges that are all the more clearly delineated. All our lives we come back to them in our daydreams. A psychoanalyst should, therefore, turn his attention to this simple localization of our memories. I should like to give the name of topoanalysis to this auxiliary of pyschoanalysis. Topoanalysis, then would be the systematic psychological study of the sites of our intimate lives.”

“We are never real historians, but always near poets, and our emotion is perhaps nothing but an expression of a poetry that was lost.”

“When the image is new, the world is new.”

“We comfort ourselves by reliving memories of protection. Something closed must retain our memories, while leaving them their original value as images. Memories of the outside world will never have the same tonality as those of home and, by recalling these memories, we add to our store of dreams; we are never real historians, but always near poets, and our emotion is perhaps nothing but an expression of a poetry that was lost.”